Northern California Wildfire

After a wet, cool spring, the 2019 Wildfire Season Northern California has kicked into high gear, with at least 100 wildfires burning over 40,000 acres. The biggest fire so is Modoc County’s Tucker Fire, which scorched more than 14,000 acres.

This year follows the most harmful wildfire season in Northern California history, burning near 1.5 million acres and endangering communities from Madera County to the Oregon border. The most devastating wildfire in California History, Butte County’s Camp Fire, burnt over 153,000 acres, ruining near 19,000 and killing 85 structures.

Southern California Wildfire

Many wildfires are also burning in southern California, endangering many neighborhoods, and making people leave their houses.

California wildfire relief funds

This year follows among Southern California’s largest and most destructive Wildfire seasons, where the Woolsey and Hill fire set over 102,000 acres ablaze, ruining 1,500 structures, killing three and forcing nearly 300,000 from their homes as mandatory evacuations were announced from Malibu to Simi Valley. San Luis Obispo County saw unbelievable damage, with six large fires springing to life in starting June.

The urgent needs of people harmed by the wildfires are high, and the recovery process will take a long time and is complex in the communities throughout the state. Please consider helping the victims of the CA wildfires by donating to any of the wildfire relief funds organizations.

Health Effects of Fires

Wildfires can lead to burns and other injuries sustained when seeking to escape the flames. They can exacerbate respiratory problems like asthma, as they generate a very harsh blend of dust, smoke, and other particulates.

Additionally, many people suffering from chronic diseases, such as hypertension and diabetes, are usually made to escape in haste and leave home without medications that are crucial to managing severe medical conditions and limiting what can quickly turn into a medical crisis.

Moreover, when temporary lodging becomes overpopulated, the risk of contracting infectious illnesses rises. Norovirus, by way of instance, is an easily spreadable gastrointestinal disease that can sicken people and warn others not to accept shelters even if it means camping outdoors, in severe weather, or residing in vehicles. This very infectious virus became an issue when Camp Fire evacuees overwhelm local accommodations.

How You Can Help Fire Victims

The 2019 California wildfire season is hitting the residents in intensity, and the fire-weary residents in the state are on edge. The past two years brought some of the worst wildfires in the history of the state, leading to more than 100 deaths as well as the destruction of thousands of buildings and houses. Officials have perceived that wildfire season continues longer each year, and recovery is harder as one extreme fire season moves into another.

CA wildfire relief funds

As of October 2019, almost 6,000 fires have flared in the state, with two of the most damaging fires this season currently burning in Southern and Northern California. Given the continuing devastation, lots of folks are wondering what can I do to help. What is most needed is generally financial help so donating to one of the wildfire relief funds is a great start.

How to Help

Immediate fire recovery requires the following: shelter, food, evacuation support, family connection, health care, and case management. After the fire has been contained, it needs long-term help for rehousing, income recovery, agricultural needs, and additional support to vulnerable populations. Because of the ongoing threat of fire, mental health counseling and support services are also a significant requirement.

We present a list of wildfire relief funds supported by the following organizations that will provide relief support for the California communities hit by the wildfires. These organizations are highlighted because they have current operations or chapters in the area, the ability to include a large influx of contributions, and a great, organized record of perfection in disaster relief services. Listed in no particular order or ranking.

SoCal Fires Disaster Relief

The American Red Cross and Los Angeles Fire Department Foundation, are accepting donations that will help “provide equipment, tools, and immediate disaster relief resources for responders and the thousands displaced or influenced” by this week’s wildfires in Riverside provinces and Los Angeles, according to the foundation’s website. Proceed to the website of foundation at supportlafd.org or directly to the donation form at supportlafd.kindful.com/?campaign=1039312, or telephone 310-552-4139.

Sandlewood Incident Fund

The city of Calimesa is currently asking people not to drop off donations of any kind in a Red Cross shelter set up for Sandalwood fire evacuees. Instead, people can donate money, checks, or gift cards in Sanctuary Church, 1090 5th St. Suite 201 in Calimesa, between 12.00 and 5 p.m. Friday to Sunday, or contribute online at www.sanctuarychurch.com/SWF. Individuals who wish to donate clothes, toiletries, blankets, food, or other things can do this at Oak Valley Church, 13553 Calimesa Blvd., Yucaipa, town officials said.

Red Cross

Image Source: redcross.org

Individuals can also make a donation to the American Red Cross to help victims of disasters nationally. The Red Cross has been developing evacuation centers to help people relocated by the Southern California fires. The Red Cross also routinely provides assistance to people whose homes have burned down. Go to redcross.org or telephone 1-800-RED-CROSS (1-800-733-2767).

Salvation Army

Image Source: alvationarmyusa.org

The Salvation Army “works in association with government and non-profit agencies to give food, personal requirements, and shelter to victims and first responders,” mentioned on its site. Similarly, it notes that donations like used furniture and clothing are sometimes required by disaster victims. Asks people to consider donating those sorts of items to their regional thrift store; cash contributions are the most effective way to get victims what they need, the organization states. Go to salvationarmy-socal.org/southern-california/news/ca-wildfires or call 562-264-3600!

California Community Foundation’s Wildfire Relief Fund

The capital has awarded over $22 million for relief and recovery efforts in the wake of California wildfires. Since it started in 2003, the organization says on its site. Among its many initiatives, it has assisted those who helped rebuild houses have lost jobs, property, and home. Helped rebuild homes and provided help with health care and respiratory equipment. Visit calfund.org/wildfire-relief-fund or telephone 213-413-4130 for detailed information.

United Way

United Way of the Inland Valleys has made a wildfire relief funds to help victims of the Sandalwood fire in Calimesa. Go to uwiv.org/sandalwood-fire or telephone 951-697-4700. The organization’s Greater Los Angeles division has a Southern California Disaster Relief Fund that it says helps low-income residents hit by wildfires. Go to unitedwayla.org/en/give/disaster-relief-fund or telephone 213-808-6220.

Los Angeles County Fire Department Foundation

The nonprofit organization intends to educate the community on fire safety in addition to other life-safety issues. It raises awareness and money to help the Los Angeles County Fire Department accomplish those goals. Visit lacfdf.org or telephone 323-81-3037.

Catholic Archdiocese of Los Angeles

The archdiocese created a fund to assist victims of the 2018 Thomas fire. Expanded it to assist those affected by other fires since then. The church declared Friday that the fund would help individuals affected by the wildfires in Los Angeles and Ventura counties. They were not seeking donations Friday, but stated individuals needing food, temporary shelter, or other support should talk to the pastor of their nearest church. Go to la-archdiocese.org or call 213-637-7000.

Butte County

  • Butte Strong Fund of the North Valley Community Foundation is assigned to encourage organizations. Offering direct relief to people affected by the Camp Fire in five areas of significant work. Even more, housing, Education, Health and Wellness, Community Development, and Business Recovery.
  • Camp Fire Long-Term Recovery Group Offers support for the unmet needs of Camp Fire victims.
  • Butte 211 comes with a comprehensive list of fire information, programs, and services for those affected by the Camp Fire.
  • Because of the strong requirement for disaster case management, a Community Queue has been set to connect Camp Fire Survivors and case managers as they become available. Survivors needing a disaster case supervisor or looking to take the primary steps in appealing for Emergency Financial Assistance through the Butte Strong Fund can start the procedure online: bit.ly/211intake. Please, be aware that this program isn’t immediate support, and the application process may take at least 6 weeks. Patience is recognized as responding agencies work together to deal with extensive community need for disaster case management.
  • Butte County has information on a broad range of services for those affected by wildfires. Visitors may also find contacts for volunteer opportunities and localized information.
  • American Red Cross Gold Country Region offers access to meals, shelters, and emergency supplies. In addition to connecting affected residents to other sources.

When helping relief organizations, think to mark your wildfire relief funds gift as general operating support. By doing so, you enable the company to respond to current disasters. Be ready for those that may arise in the future. Go to disaster giving pages for more advice on the best way best to maximize your impact when contributing to disaster relief.